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Chapter 14: 4-6
P'sukei D'zimroh

4. Mizmor l'sodah [Psalm 100, "A Psalm of thanksgiving"] is recited while standing. It should be recited with happiness, for it was instituted in place of a thanksgiving offering.

Similarly, the verses from Vayivorech Dovid until Attoh hu Adon-noi hoElohim, should be said while standing. Also, the song [sung at the Red Sea] should be recited while standing, with concentration and with happiness. Similarly, the blessing Yishtabach should be recited while standing.

5. Mizmor l'sodoh is not recited on Sabbaths and festivals, because the thanksgiving offering was categorized as a "voluntary offering," and such offerings were not sacrificed on Sabbaths and festivals. Similarly, it is not recited on the Chol Hamo'ed days of Pesach, since a thanksgiving offering was not sacrificed then, because, together with the offering, one was required to bring ten breads, which were chometz.

This psalm is also not recited on Pesach eve, [for such sacrifices were not offered then] out of fear that [the breads which were chometz] would not be eaten until chometz became forbidden, and it would be necessary to burn them. Similarly, it is omitted on Yom Kippur eve. [These sacrifices were also not offered then,] for doing so minimizes the time in which the sacrifice could be eaten and thus causes sacred meat to de disqualified for consumption.

6. The following rules apply to a person who delayed coming to the synagogue until after the minyan had begun to pray, to the extent that were he to follow the regular order of prayers, he would not be able to recite the Shemoneh Esreh with the minyan. Since what is most essential is that he recite the Shemoneh Esreh with a minyan, he is allowed to skip certain prayers, as will be explained:

The blessing al netilas yodoyim, Elo-hai neshomaoh, and the blessing for Torah study must be recited before prayer (as explained in Chapter 7).

Therefore, if a person did not recite them at home, he must recite them in the synagogue, even though doing so will prevent him from reciting the Shemoneh Esreh with the minyan.

Similarly, in the morning service, the Shema and its blessings must be recited before the Shemoneh Esreh; i.e. one must recite the prayers in order, beginning from the blessing yotzer or until after the Shemoneh Esreh with out interruption (in order to recite the blessing for redemption, go'al Yisroel, directly before the Shemoneh Esreh). However, the other blessings and the entire order of P'sukei D'zimroh (with the exception of the blessings Boruch she'omar and Yishtabach) can also be recited after the Shemonah Esreh.* * { The Mishnoh Beruroh 52:5,6 states that it is preferable to pray without a minyan than to skip Boruch she'omar, Ashrei, and Yishtabach. On Shabbos, the additional prayers beginning Nishamas should also be recited.}

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Halacha-Yomi, Copyright (c) 1999 Project Genesis, Inc.

 






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