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Chapter 15: 7-9
Laws Pertaining to Kaddish

7. If there are not nine people to respond to the chazon, he should not recite Kaddish at all, for all holy matters, should not be recited unless ten people are present - i.e., one person reciting and nine responding. Nevertheless, if one of the ten is reciting the Shemoneh Esreh, even though he cannot respond "Amen" with the others, he may be included. The above also applies if two, three, or four [of the ten are reciting the Shemoneh Esreh]. As long as the majority of the minyan can answer, the minority's inability to respond "Amen" is not a disqualifying factor. (See also Chapter 20, Law 2.*)

* {There it states that more severe laws apply to the recitation of the Shemoneh Esreh.}

If one of the ten is sleeping, it is necessary to wake him, for sleeping person cannot be counted as one of ten. *

* {The Shulchon Oruch HoRav 55:8 also quotes this decision. However, the Mishnoh Beruroh 55:32 allows leniency in a difficult situation. }

8. After the chazon concludes the half-Kaddish, he should recite in a loud voice Borchu es Ado-noi ham'voroch. The congregation responds Boruch Ado'noi ham'voroch l'olom vo'ed. The chazon then repeats Boruch Ado-noi ham'voroch l'olom vo'ed, and thus does not exclude himself from the others. [It would be improper] for him to call them to bless G-d without reciting such a blessing himself.

Some follow the custom of reciting "Amen" in response to the chazon. However, the chazon should not respond "Amen" to the congregation.

If the chazon prolongs his recitation of Borchu with melodies, the congregation recites the additional prayer Yisborach. However, this prayer should be recited only while he is singing. In contrast, while he is reciting the words, the congregation should not say anything, but rather should listen to what he is saying.

Even a person who did not hear the chazon recite Borchu, but did hear the congregation respond Boruch Ado-noi ham'voroch..., may respond together with them.

9. An attempt should be made to recite the Kedushoh in the blessing yotzer or, together with a minyan. If that is impossible, it may be recited alone.*

* { The Shulchon Oruch 59:3 advises chanting the verses using the cantillation notes when reciting it alone.}

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Halacha-Yomi, Copyright (c) 1999 Project Genesis, Inc.

 






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