Torah.org Home Subscribe Services Support Us
 
Print Version

Email this article to a friend

Chapter 54: 4-6
Laws of Primary and Secondary Foods

4. If the person desires both of them - e.g., he wants to drink an alcoholic beverage, but also eat pastries, honey cookies, preserves, or the like, he must recite blessings for both of them. First, he should recite the blessing on the pastries or the preserves, for they are more important, and then recite the blessing on the alcoholic beverages.

This is surely the case when one eats pastry and drinks coffee. One must recite blessing for both of them - first for the pastry, and then for the coffee - because one desires them both.

5. If two types of food are cooked together, and each type of food is separate, one should recite the appropriate blessing for each one individually. However, if they are crushed and stuck together, we follow the majority - i.e., the food which is the majority is considered as the ikar. The appropriate blessing for it is recited, and in doing so, one covers the other food.* However, if one of the two foods is made of one of the five species of grain, even if it is in the minority, it is considered the ikar, as explained in Chapter 48, Law 10.

* {The Pri Megodim 208:7 and the Mishnoh B'rurah 212:1 state that, as long as the two are cooked together, even if they are separate entities, one blessing is sufficient. (The same decision is apparent from the Shulchon Oruch HoRav 212:1.)

6.The following laws apply when milk or soup is poured onto a food with the intention of eating the two together. If one's primary intention is for the food, it is necessary to recite a blessing only for it. The milk or soup is considered as tofeil [and does not require a separate blessing of its own]. If one's intention is for them both (and different blessings must be recited for them), one should first recite a blessing for the food, eat some of it, and afterwards recite a blessing on the milk or soup.

In this regard, the relative quantities of the foods are not significant. Even if the food is a product of the five species of grain, it is not considered as an ikar [to the extent that a second blessing is not required] in this context. (The laws applying to foods cooked in water and milk are explained in Chapters 48 and 53.)

BackPrimary and Secondary Foods
Paragraphs 1-3
   Primary and Secondary Foods
Paragraphs 7-9
Next
Table of Contents

Halacha-Yomi, Copyright (c) 2000 ProjectGenesis, Inc.

 






ARTICLES ON DEVARIM AND THE THREE WEEKS:

View Complete List

Not To Worry, G-d's In Charge
Rabbi Pinchas Avruch - 5765

To See or Not to See - That is the Question
Rabbi Yosef Kalatzky - 5762

Speaking Louder
Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky - 5756

ArtScroll

Forgotten Oaths
Rabbi Aron Tendler - 5764

Don't Just Scratch the Surface
Shlomo Katz - 5762

Kamtza and Bar-Kamtza
Rabbi Yisroel Ciner - 5758

Frumster - Orthodox Jewish Dating

Body Language
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig - 5771

Learning to Love What Is!
Rabbi Label Lam - 5767

Immortal Teacher
Rabbi Aron Tendler - 5760

> It's Not What You Want - But How You Ask
Rabbi Eliyahu Hoffmann - 5759

A Day of Rebuilding
Rabbi Label Lam - 5761

In Our Best Interest
Rabbi Elly Broch - 5764

Looking for a Chavrusah?

Harnessing Powers
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5761

Paradise Lost
Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky - 5759

Petty Squabble to Baseless Hatred
Rabbi Yaakov Menken - 5758

Mourning on the 9th of Av: The Reasons
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5757



Project Genesis

Torah.org Home


Torah Portion

Jewish Law

Ethics

Texts

Learn the Basics

Seasons

Features

TORAHAUDIO

Ask The Rabbi

Knowledge Base




Help

About Us

Contact Us



Free Book on Geulah!




Torah.org Home
Torah.org HomeCapalon.com Copyright Information