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Chapter 54: 4-6
Laws of Primary and Secondary Foods

4. If the person desires both of them - e.g., he wants to drink an alcoholic beverage, but also eat pastries, honey cookies, preserves, or the like, he must recite blessings for both of them. First, he should recite the blessing on the pastries or the preserves, for they are more important, and then recite the blessing on the alcoholic beverages.

This is surely the case when one eats pastry and drinks coffee. One must recite blessing for both of them - first for the pastry, and then for the coffee - because one desires them both.

5. If two types of food are cooked together, and each type of food is separate, one should recite the appropriate blessing for each one individually. However, if they are crushed and stuck together, we follow the majority - i.e., the food which is the majority is considered as the ikar. The appropriate blessing for it is recited, and in doing so, one covers the other food.* However, if one of the two foods is made of one of the five species of grain, even if it is in the minority, it is considered the ikar, as explained in Chapter 48, Law 10.

* {The Pri Megodim 208:7 and the Mishnoh B'rurah 212:1 state that, as long as the two are cooked together, even if they are separate entities, one blessing is sufficient. (The same decision is apparent from the Shulchon Oruch HoRav 212:1.)

6.The following laws apply when milk or soup is poured onto a food with the intention of eating the two together. If one's primary intention is for the food, it is necessary to recite a blessing only for it. The milk or soup is considered as tofeil [and does not require a separate blessing of its own]. If one's intention is for them both (and different blessings must be recited for them), one should first recite a blessing for the food, eat some of it, and afterwards recite a blessing on the milk or soup.

In this regard, the relative quantities of the foods are not significant. Even if the food is a product of the five species of grain, it is not considered as an ikar [to the extent that a second blessing is not required] in this context. (The laws applying to foods cooked in water and milk are explained in Chapters 48 and 53.)

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