Torah.org Home Subscribe Services Support Us
 
Print Version

Email this article to a friend

Chapter 57: 4-7
Foods Brought after Original Serving

4. [When a person was served fruit] and then, he was brought a second type of fruit which was more important and which he preferred more than the first type, or the fruit served afterwards was of the seven species with which Eretz Yisroel is blessed, a blessing must be recited for the fruit served afterwards. This applies even if some of the fruit originally served still remains. A [blessing over a] less important fruit cannot cover an important fruit incidentally. This is possible only when one has the specific intention of including it when reciting the blessing (as stated above, Chapter 50, Law 11).

5. When a person recited a blessing for beer, with the intention of including everything which he will later be served that requires the blessing shehakol, he does not have to recite a second blessing if he is later served fish. However, if he did not have a specific intention to that effect, he must recite a second blessing for the fish, even though the beer is before him when the fish is served.

The principles that apply to fruit are not relevant in this instance, since although one type of fruit may be apples and the other nuts, they are still in the same general category. In contrast, beer and fish are two separate categories - one is food and the other drink - and [a blessing recited] on one cannot cover the other, unless they were both present when the blessing is recited, or one has the specific intention of including them in the same blessing.

6. The above applies only when a person eats his own food. However, if he is eating as a guest of a colleague, once he recites a blessing for one type of food, he covers all that he will later be served, even though none of the food for which he originally recited the blessing remains. Everything depends on the host's intention. However, a person who truly changes his mind is required to recite a second blessing.

Even if the host did not intend to serve more food and only did so at the request of the guests, the guests are not required to recite a second blessing. The guests rely on the fact that, most likely, the host will give them all the food they require.

7. If a person who comes to a meal is given a cup [containing drink] and recites a blessing for it, and afterwards is given other cups, he need not recite a second blessing, should this be the prevailing custom. In that event, he most likely had the intention of drinking all [that he would be served].

BackFoods Brought after Original Serving
Paragraphs 1-3
   
Table of Contents

Halacha-Yomi, Copyright (c) 2000 ProjectGenesis, Inc.

 
Sell Chometz Online


ARTICLES ON PESACH:

View Complete List

15 Steps To Freedom
Rabbi Dovid Green - 5757

You and Your Sons
Rabbi Yaakov Menken - 5757

Who Knows One?
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5758

> Thanks for Everything
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5766

Intimacy On A Higher Scale
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig - 5774

Providing for the Needy
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5756

Looking for a Chavrusah?

Pesach Questions
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5757

Passover Never Passes Over
Rabbi Dovid Green - 5762

Pesach Food
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5756

Frumster - Orthodox Jewish Dating

A New Outlook
Rabbi Shlomo Jarcaig - 5763

What is the Question?
Rabbi Label Lam - 5763

The Servants of G-d
Rabbi Yaakov Menken - 5763

ArtScroll

Kid Tips
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5755

Out of Order
Rabbi Label Lam - 5774

There's One in Every Generation
Rabbi Yaakov Menken - 5759

The Exit Strategy
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5767



Project Genesis

Torah.org Home


Torah Portion

Jewish Law

Ethics

Texts

Learn the Basics

Seasons

Features

TORAHAUDIO

Ask The Rabbi

Knowledge Base




Help

About Us

Contact Us



Free Book on Geulah!




Torah.org Home
Torah.org HomeCapalon.com Copyright Information