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Chapter 89:4
A Base for a Mukteh Item

4. An object does not become a base for [a muktzeh article, and therefore muktzeh itself,] unless the muktzeh item was placed on it [before] "bein hash'moshos" ("twilight") (1). If, however, the muktzeh article was not on the object "bein hash'moshos", but placed there afterwards, the object is not considered a base, and one may move it even while the muktzeh is still on it (2). Therefore, it is permissible to shake bones and peels off a table or tablecloth on Shabbos (3) (that is, as long as the table did not become muktzeh as a result of being a base to the candelabra, as mentioned in 89:2).

FOOTNOTES:

(1) This refers to the period between sunset and the appearance of three stars, during which we refrain from doing activities which are prohibited on Shabbos, due to our inability to determine the precise moment that "night" (and therefore, shabbos), begins. In order for the object to become a base for the muktzeh, the muktzeh item must be resting upon it for the entire "bein hashmashos" period.

(2) The Mishnah Berurah (310:37) disagrees; he rules that if a muktzeh item is placed upon another object on Shabbos, that object is forbidden to be moved while the muktzeh is on top of it. Should one desire to move it, one must try to shake the muktzeh article off. If that is impossible, or it is possible that the forbidden article will break when falling, one should place a permitted article (which is more "important" (see 89:2) than the muktzeh item) on top of the object as well. Then, the base may be carried with both articles upon it.

(3) Nutshells (with no remnant of nut in them), eggshells, inedible pits, and inedible bones (with no meat on them, and in places where there are no dogs around) are considered "muktzeh machamas gufo" and may not be moved on Shabbos. When one is peeling nuts or eggs, etc, on Shabbos, one should try to place the waste either directly into the trash, or into a plate which contains a tiny piece of bread; in that way, one may simply tip the contents into the trash. If this inedible waste was placed on the table or table-cloth, and one needs the space on the table or wants to clear the table in honor of Shabbos, one may indirectly push it (for example, with a knife) into a dustpan which contains a tiny piece of bread, and then the contents of the dustpan may be emptied into the trash ("Muktzeh: A Practical Guide" by Rav S.B Cohen, pg167).

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Halacha-Yomi, Copyright (c) 2002 Project Genesis, Inc.

 

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