Home Subscribe Services Support Us
Print Version

Email this article to a friend

Parshas Vaeschanan

The Multilayered Torah

The Torah as we all well know is multilayered. The rabbis have taught us that there are seventy facets to every piece of the written Torah. We are also aware that no written word can adequately convey to us all of the nuances and possible meanings that lie embedded in the written word. Therefore the Torah requires elucidation, commentary and explanation in order for any proper understanding of its message to be gained.

The entire book of Dvarim is an elucidation and explanation of the first four books of Moshe. As such, by the inherent nature of explanation and commentary, different words and phrases will be employed to describe events and commandments that were previously mentioned in the Torah.

A prime example of this appears in this week’s parsha where the Torah repeats for us the Ten Commandments revealed to Israel at Sinai. The wording here in Dvarim differs slightly from the wording recorded for us in Shemot. The Talmud in its rendition of the Oral Law states that these discrepancies – such as the use of the word shamor instead of the original zachor regarding the observance of the Shabat – indicate that these words were stated simultaneously by God, so to speak, a feat that is beyond human comprehension and ability.

The Talmud means to indicate to us with this statement that all of the possible interpretations and layers of meaning in the Torah were given to us simultaneously and at once at Sinai. Only the Oral Law and the work of the commentators to the Torah over all of the ages has revealed to us these original layers of meaning and interpretation for our study and practice.

By using different words to explain what was already written, the Torah guides our understanding of the Torah only by way of the Oral Law and the great commentators of Israel over the ages.

In the final commandment of the Ten Commandments, the Torah here in Dvarim uses the word titaveh whereas in Shemot it used the word tachmode. The Torah points out to us that there are different forms of desire and wanting something. One is an impulsive, spur of the moment desire that arises out of seemingly chance circumstance – an advertisement in the media or a chance meeting or sighting. Such a desire is not planned and stems from the inherent human weakness within all of us to want to possess what we do not yet have. But there is another type of desire. It is long planned and had been part of our lives for years and decades. It borders on being an obsession or an addiction within our makeup.

Both of these types of desire can destroy a person. The Torah cautions us against these symptoms of self-destructive behavior. And by the use of these different Hebrew verbs, the Torah indicates to us that there are different types of desires and that one must be defensive against all of them.

The Talmud tells us that the eyes see and the heart thereupon desires. Guarding one’s eyes guards one’s heart as well. This example of the Torah’s self elucidation of the matter makes the lesson clear to all and challenges us to apply it wisely in one’s own life.

Shabat shalom,

Rabbi Berel Wein

Crash course in Jewish history

Rabbi Berel Wein- Jewish historian, author and international lecturer offers a complete selection of CDs, audio tapes, video tapes, DVDs, and books on Jewish history at



View Complete List

Do Torah!
Shlomo Katz - 5756

To Learn and to Teach
Rabbi Aron Tendler - 5763

Let Us Make Man
Rabbi Naftali Reich - 5770

Looking for a Chavrusah?

This Time
Rabbi Label Lam - 5767

What Ends Must Have Begun!
Shlomo Katz - 5773

A Mate, not a Maid!
Rabbi Yissocher Frand - 5756

> A Deeper Look at Creation
Rabbi Pinchas Winston - 5766

A Beginning With No End
Rabbi Pinchas Winston - 5758

The Illusion of Nothingness
Rabbi Label Lam - 5773


All Beginnings Are Hard
Rabbi Berel Wein - 5770

Addressing the Jews
Rabbi Yissocher Frand - 5763

Starting Over
Rabbi Yisroel Ciner - 5760

Frumster - Orthodox Jewish Dating

Chochmah, Tevunah, and Daat
Shlomo Katz - 5769

Meaning and Purpose: A Good Beginning
Rabbi Label Lam - 5769

To Rise or to Fall
Rabbi Yaakov Menken - 5755

An Enlightening Insight Into The Meaning of Gadol and Katan
Rabbi Yissocher Frand - 5765

Project Genesis Home

Torah Portion

Jewish Law



Learn the Basics




Ask The Rabbi

Knowledge Base


About Us

Contact Us

Free Book on Geulah! Home Copyright Information