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Frames

Rabbi Raymond Beyda

There is something about a frame that makes an average picture beautiful. It may be a family photo or an expensive piece of art --regardless of its untrimmed beauty -- a frame takes it to the next level. Choosing the right frame for the picture and the setting in which it will be placed is a big factor on how pleasing it will look to the eye of the beholder. Different frame -- different reaction.

A person has free will as to how he or she will react to any given situation. In fact, two people may see the same event and react quite differently from one another. One may sit calmly and "let it slide" while another may blow up and react violently. It depends on how each sees the "picture". An initial reaction is not always the best response. A good way to control temper is to re-frame the pictures that aggravate. One way to react and to defuse an otherwise explosive situation is to say: "This is just a test. G-d wants me to grow so he sent me this situation to see if I can control myself." Another is to say, "This too shall pass. It always does!" Or perhaps a frustrating situation calls for a frame that says: "The reward is commensurate with the pain." Today when something or someone is about to get your goat -- just before you lose it -- stop. It only takes a minute to take the picture out of the ugly frame it is in and to reframe it into a beautiful work that will yield personal improvement and growth.

DID YOU KNOW THAT

For Sefaradim who say only one blessing when donning tefillin -- if one is putting on his tefillin and he is at the point between wrapping the straps on the arm and placing the piece on his head and he hears another finishing the blessing "l'haneah tefillin" -- it is preferred that he refrain and not answer "amen" to his neighbor's blessing.

If, however, he did respond with "amen" it is not considered an interruption and he does not have to say a blessing before donning his headpiece. [Source: Osrot Yosef, Halakha Berurah volume 2, siman 5]

CONSIDER THIS FOR A MINUTE

It is a sin to lie to another -- it is ridiculous to fool oneself. [Rabbi Bunim of P’sishcha]


Text Copyright © 2004 Rabbi Raymond Beyda and Torah.org.


 






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