Torah.org Home Subscribe Services Support Us
 
Print Version

Email this article to a friend

The Path of the Just

Chapter 14 (Part 2)

Not only would the righteous choose to abstain from certain common pleasures and to always be more halachically stringent as we’d said; they’d also agree to certain other restrictions.

But once again the point needs to be made that these farther-reaching and very consequential sorts of abstentions are not at all required of the rest of us; they’re beyond the ordinary. Yet we could learn a thing or two from them, which we’ll try to underscore.

The type of abstentions we’re about to enunciate are the sort that those who would want (and are qualified) to be pious would follow because they’re in keeping with their dreams of a truer and deeper degree of closeness to G-d than we can imagine or would strive for. (In fact, if we decided to abide by these practices to the degree the pious would, our actions would be deemed off-the-mark and we’d justifiably be advised to stop.)

The pious would “seclude and detach” themselves “from the company of others” as often as possible, and would “direct (their) heart” instead to more and more Divine service. That’s to say, they’d live apart from the main stream of society and would spend their days and nights with G-d alone, in private worship and reverie. (One could easily see how the great majority of us should be discouraged from following that path. Still and all we might seclude ourselves occasionally -- at certain times of the day, once a month perhaps, on especially challenging occasions, etc., but always with the intent of drawing upon the experience as nourishment for when we’re back in the thick of things.)

But Ramchal is quick to point out that even the pious shouldn’t go too far in this. He advises them to be sure to “join in with good people for the amount of time you’d need to study Torah (, to pray,) or to earn a living” as we all must, but to then “go in seclusion in order to attach yourself to G-d and to come to understand the way of goodness and the true way to serve G-d”.

And he adds the following additional example of abstinence which we too would be wise to follow. He advises us all to acclimate ourselves to speaking less and to avoiding small talk, and to “not look beyond (our) own environs”, that’s to say, to not envy others for what they have, and to not muse about the unfeasible and unlikely.


Text Copyright © 2007 by Rabbi Yaakov Feldman and Torah.org


 

ARTICLES ON YISRO AND TU BESHVAT:

View Complete List

Spring to Life
Rabbi Yehudah Prero - 5768

G-d Cares
Shlomo Katz - 5766

Two Tablets: Prescription for Jewish Observance
Rabbi Osher Chaim Levene - 5769

Frumster - Orthodox Jewish Dating

"Lo Sachmod": Two Approaches
Rabbi Yissocher Frand - 5770

The Sweet Taste of Victory
Rabbi Label Lam - 5768

Proper treatment of the Convert
Rabbi Berel Wein - 5771

Looking for a Chavrusah?

What Happened
Rabbi Label Lam - 5773

What Did Yisro Hear That Prompted Him
Rabbi Yissocher Frand - 5773

Always Go to Court Before Starting a Fight
Rabbi Yaakov Menken - 5758

> First Hand Experience
Rabbi Yisroel Ciner - 5760

The Birth of the Blues
Rabbi Label Lam - 5763

Return to Sender
Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky - 5759

ArtScroll

What's News
Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky - 5762

Divine Computers
Rabbi Dovid Green - 5760

No Justice No Place
Rabbi Mordechai Kamenetzky - 5757

Recognize the value of others
Rabbi Yisroel Ciner - 5758



Project Genesis

Torah.org Home


Torah Portion

Jewish Law

Ethics

Texts

Learn the Basics

Seasons

Features

TORAHAUDIO

Ask The Rabbi

Knowledge Base




Help

About Us

Contact Us



Free Book on Geulah!




Torah.org Home
Torah.org HomeCapalon.com Copyright Information