Home Subscribe Services Support Us
Print Version

Email this article to a friend

Parshas Beshalach

Song of Moses and Isreal

The centerpiece of this week's parsha is naturally the great song of Moses and of the Jewish people after their moment of deliverance from Pharaoh and the flooding sea. This song of Moses and of Israel is repeated daily throughout the centuries of Jewish life in our morning prayer service.

The exultation of the moment is still retained and felt many generations later in the unmatched prose and poetry written in the Torah. What makes this song unique is that there is no reference to human bravery, to the courage of the Jewish people in plunging into the sea or to the leadership of Moses and Aaron in shepherding the Jewish people through this crisis. Rather the entire poem/song is a paean of praise and appreciation dedicated to the God of Israel.

God operates, so to speak, through human beings and world events. Many times His presence is hidden from our sight. Sometimes it is even willfully ignored. In later victories and triumphs of the Jewish people and of Israel, it is the human element that helps fashion those victories and triumphs that is acknowledged and celebrated.

But here in the song of Moses and Israel we have an acknowledgement of God's great hand without ascribing any credit to human beings and natural and social forces. I think that this is perhaps the one facet that makes this song so unique. Compare it to the song of Deborah, which forms the haftorah to this week's parsha. In that song the prophetess assigns a great deal of credit to the armed forces of Israel, to Barack its general, and even to Deborah herself, a fact that does not escape the notice of the rabbis of the Talmud. No such self-aggrandizement appears in the song of Moses and Israel at Yam Suf.

This is completely in line with the character of Moses who is described in the Torah as being the most humble and self-effacing of all human beings. There is no question that without Moses there would not have been an exodus from Egypt nor salvation of Israel on the shores of the Yam Suf. But it would be completely out of character for Moses to assign any of the credit for these enormous and miraculous achievements to himself or his actions and leadership.

Thus the greatest of leaders and the most gifted of prophets attains that championship of leadership and prophecy by downplaying his role. Moses is well aware of his greatness and his unique relationship with the God of Israel. He is not naÔve enough to think of himself as a plain ordinary human being. To do so would really be a form of ersatz humility. But he is wise enough to realize that this exalted status that he has attained is little more than a gift that God has bestowed upon him.

From the beginning of his leadership career, when he attempted to refuse becoming the leader of Israel till his last days on earth, he retains this innate humility, which in fact allows him to be the strongest of leaders and most courageous of prophets. There is a lesson in this for all later generations and for all of us that aspire to positions of leadership and importance. That is why this song of Moses and Israel is repeated daily in Jewish life.

Shabat shalom

Rabbi Berel Wein

Crash course in Jewish history

Rabbi Berel Wein- Jewish historian, author and international lecturer offers a complete selection of CDs, audio tapes, video tapes, DVDs, and books on Jewish history at



View Complete List

What Ends Must Have Begun!
Shlomo Katz - 5773

Marriage Is About Giving
Rabbi Yissocher Frand - 5776

Picking Up the Pieces
Rabbi Eliyahu Hoffmann - 5761


A Deeper Look at Creation
Rabbi Pinchas Winston - 5766

Chochmah, Tevunah, and Daat
Shlomo Katz - 5769

Forbidden Fruit - The Good and the Bad
Rabbi Eliyahu Hoffmann - 5763

Looking for a Chavrusah?

Human Separation and Value
Rabbi Aron Tendler - 5762

Itís All About Redemption Part I
Rabbi Aron Tendler - 5766

A Mate, not a Maid!
Rabbi Yissocher Frand - 5756

Frumster - Orthodox Jewish Dating

In The Beginning
Shlomo Katz - 5763

In the Bias of the Beholder
Rabbi Yaakov Menken - 5764

A Springtime of the Spirit
Rabbi Naftali Reich - 5767

> The Choas of Creation
Rabbi Pinchas Winston - 5774

To Rule is Divine
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig - 5775

The Easy Way Out!
Rabbi Label Lam - 5770

Which Came First?
Shlomo Katz - 5774

Project Genesis Home

Torah Portion

Jewish Law



Learn the Basics




Ask The Rabbi

Knowledge Base


About Us

Contact Us

Free Book on Geulah! Home Copyright Information